Visit The Waitomo Glowworm

Ngebray.com,- Spending hours on all fours in a cold, wet and dark cave doesn’t particularly sound like a great holiday outing but the glow worms of Waitomo Caves in New Zealand sure know how to put on a show to keep the damp at bay.

Reality hit us as we stood on the edge of underground waterfall, peering gingerly at the swirling mass of foamy water roughly two metres below. Are we really going to sleep backwards into the icy darkness? What if we accidentally somersault and land on my head? What if we sink under and can’t surface for air? What ifs. Why do people always conjure up the worst possible scenarios?

The deafening din of the waterfall masked the cheer from above. Feeling slightly embarrassed, the waterfall didn’t seem that high after all. Nevertheless, it was relieved to have survived the jump. Hurling backwards off underground waterfalls is one of the many exciting aspects of black water rafting. Although it is called black water rafting, rafts are not used and the water is not black. This sport involves navigating a network of caves, rivers and underground waterfalls on an inner tyre tube.

Picture from waitomo.com

Picture from waitomo.com

The heart of this sport is located in Waitomo, an area that is littered with limestone caves formed by 30 million years of volcanic and geological activities. Visitors have been flocking to the Waitomo caves that even the Queen of England has come to see? The main attraction here is, in fact, smaller than your pinkie finger. Found together in large numbers, tiny creatures called glow worms emit a soft light, creating the illusion of twinkling stars against the black underground canvas.