Confusion Over Trump’s Order Barring Muslim Countries

Ngebray.com,- On Saturday, crowds gathered at airports around the country. “No hate, no fear immigrants are welcome here”. That’s the voice of them. They were protesting President Trump’s ban on immigrants and refugees from places like Syria, Iraq, and Iran from entering the US. That same day, Trump told reporters that the rollout of his executive order was going according to plan. He said that It’s working out very nicely. But a closer look shows widespread confision over who exactly the seven country ban applied to. And whether various government bodies were properly prepared to implement it. Or to explain it to the American people.

Picture from cbc.ca

Picture from cbc.ca

CNN reported that Homeland Security officials weren’t given details of the plan until Friday, the day it was signed. And Republican Senator, Rob Portman, on Sunday said, “ I didn’t believe the plan was well thought out. This was an extreme vetting program that wasn’t properly vetted.” Trump Press Secretary Sean Spicer, though, pushed back on Sunday. He said that the people that needed to know knew. But throughout the rollout, it was unclear who the ban applied to. The order freezes the entire refugee program for four months. The Bars Syrians from entering as refugees indefinitely. It also bars people from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria, and Yemen from entering the US for at least 90 days after the order takes effect.

There was confusion about the status of green card holders from those countries. Who were currently outside the United States. Originally, officials from DHS said the ban applied to them, too. But Trump Chief of Staff Reince Priebus Seemed to be issuing a clarification. The executive order doesn’t affect green card holders moving forward. He also though seemed to somewhat contradict that remark by adding the border agents had what he called discretionary authority to detain and question suspicious travelers from certain countries. The rationale for the executive order also seemed mired in mixed messages. President Trump issued it to protect the American people from terrorist attacks by foreign nationals admitted to the United States.

Dozens of plots in the US since 2001, few were attempted or carried out by suspects who came from the countries targeted by the ban. The 19 men involved in the September 1th attacks were from Egypt, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, and the United Arab Emirates, which are not named in the ban. Several major US plots that were thwarted over the years also did not involve people from the seven countries specified in Mr. Trump’s order.